Tag Archives: AprPAD

You don’t even know my name

If I were a secret
people would look after me
try to hide me
whisper about me

If I were a secret
I would draw attention
I’d be cherished
I’d be held

If I were a secret
you’d want to know
everything about me
you’d keep me for yourself
you’d never let me go

But I’m not
I’m out in the open
you walk all over me
yet you never notice me
you don’t even know my name

You willingly share me
with everyone who happens to be
at the same place
at the same time

You move forward
without ever looking back
trusting there will always be
another
wherever you go

You don’t even know my name

From today’s prompt on #NaPoWriMo.net I picked up upon ‘compelling repetitive effects’. Or, at least on repetitive effects – if it’s compelling that’s up to you 🙂

I’m not sure how to introduce this poem, other than that I love it: https://thesilentcacophony.wordpress.com/2018/04/19/glopowrimo-19-30/. It feautures freckles and faucets, both in unexpected ways.

#That’s #NaPoWriMo day 19 done. Outside, in the morning sunshine. Have a good day everyone!

You don't even know my name

by Angela van Son


 

To the none

My mind will race you
to stay ahead

Darkness followed me around
surreptitiously, you never noticed

Push you to your limits
My own little death eater

Red or black – which do you prefer?
All of us will bleed purple ink

Only through voodoo
to be a pin cushion

Down, down, down into the depths
Your soul? I couldn’t care less

What will bug you no more
is my heart
it eats what it loves

Death by love
Had I not looked into the mirror
I’d see my own true worth

Shit numbers – strings of them
to the sounds of a thunderstorm

Say it now – and it will be heard no more

IMG_20180418_090156

Today was the perfect excuse to get out Life, sex and death. A poetry collection (Vol 1) by David Ellis. The prompt was:

  1. Find a poem in a book or magazine (ideally one you are not familiar with).
  2. Use a piece of paper to cover over everything but the last line.
  3. Now write a line of your own that completes the thought of that single line you can see, or otherwise responds to it.
  4. Move your piece of paper up to uncover the second-to-last line of your source poem
  5. Write the second line of your new poem to complete/respond to this second-to-last line.
  6. Etc.

The prompt also featured a lovely resource:  this collection of images of poets’ first drafts of their poems, complete with their crossings-out/notes. So I’ve made a picture of David’s book, and my first draft next to it. The purple lines are by David, the green ones were my response.

David’s poem called The Only Light That Matters In My World is a love poem, and it’s longer than mine. I simply finished mine after I had filled two pages in my note book. David wrote the poem April 2014. His poem is loving and light. Four years it sparks a poem that’s dark and heavy…

(By the way: my guess is April is not a coincidence, since I know David through #NaPoWriMo 😉

Many thanks to NaPoWriMo.net for the inspiration for day 18, and for the connections this month brings.

Death by poetry

When I read your words
I choked
on their meaning

Off prompt micropoetry for day 17 of #NaPoWriMo. Today’s prompt made me realise I do not come from a line of storytellers. The prompt was to write a poem re-telling a family anecdote that has stuck with you over time. I could make one up, but I don’t want to do that. So, let’s focus on the storytelling of some fellow participants instead:

Bruce Niedt writes about Darth Vader wanting to make the empire great again.

Brian Ens wrote an ode to libraries – he describes a feeling many of us will recognise.

Flutterby wrote a beautiful piece a boy playing soldier. (Can someone please name the form for me?)

IMG_20180417_100255

Elixer

They made him seem such a hero
but they left out the bit
where he fondled the dwarfs

They made him seem such a hero
but they left out the bit
where he provided the GHB for the apple

They made him seem such a hero
but they left out the bit
where she couldn’t marry in white

They made him seem such a hero
but they left out the bit
where he called her ‘my immaculate’

She was no fool
She knew the ways of the world

She was no fool
She knew what he had done

She was no fool
She knew she’d have her chance

She was no fool
She knew she’d take revenge

One drop for each fondled dwarf
Two drops for every letter in GHB
Three drops for the wedding dress
Four drops for calling her Maria – the fool

He got a night cap
Every day
For the rest of his life
She lived happily ever after

Yesterday’s prompt inspired me even through my moodiness. I guess I upended it a bit, turning the hero into a villain. And the victim into a perpetrator. I happily blame/thank a fellow participant for that. Alison Dunne.She tweeted something that got me thinking:

I’ve decided in 2018 to keep a count of how many women are victims in the cultural stuff I consume, books, plays, telly, you know. Thinking of a catchy hashtag ? I’m fully expecting it to catch on.

I love altered fairy tales. There something about something SO familiar turned into something surprising that makes me excited, that makes me smile, that makes me happy. I’ve done a couple in the past, either prompted or unprompted.

Jenny Luddingtone wrote my all time favourite altered Little Red Ridinghood story last year, for the ‘poem from a minor character’ prompt. Yesterday she wrote one about the soft spot of the wolf – and she has a point!

Since I’m a fan, I searched yesterday’s NaPoWriMo.net entries for more fairtytale related poems, coming from the prompt to write a poem in which a villain faces an unfortunate situation, and is revealed to be human (but still evil)

I found poetry tales featuring these characters from the Northern European story book:
Snow White by Smitha V.

Cinderella by Charlene Delfin

Rapunzel by Vandana Bhasin

Captain Hook by N.K. Hasen

Loki by S.G. Liput

Please leave yours in the comments if you can add to the list. They don’t need to be from this year’s #NaPoWriMo. I used an old drawing of mine, for example 😉

Elixer by Angela van Son

Proposition

When having sex
with an IT guy
do not suggest
a hard reset

It’s not helpful

A follow up to my earlier hard reset poem, on a different subject. Which probably means it’s not a follow up, but hey, it’s Sunday morning and I’m grumpy. I love today’s prompt, but I need to relax so it will have to wait. This is the prompt, suggested by poet Sarah Blake, whose second full-length book of poetry, Let’s Not Live on Earth, is newly out from Wesleyan University Press. The prompt is to write a poem in which a villain faces an unfortunate situation, and is revealed to be human (but still evil).

My daily recommendation of a fellow poet brings you to My own garden of verse, who reveils the true meaning of ASAP in her day 13 poem. If you happen to read german (or don’t mind the poetic license of Google translate), I also recommend Aus dem Schaukelstuhl. It combines sensory details with big questions in a loving way.

No explanations were made by Eric Rebaser

No explanations were made by Eric Rebaser

I’m happy that I can show you some of Eric’s amazing photography, by combining it with my poems. One of the wonderful things about #NaPoWriMo is sharing inspiration, fun and beauty in many forms.

The picture probably has a lot more in common with my mood than it has with the lighthearted poem. Consider that poetic license as well 😉

 

Restatement

I’ve lost my last leg to stand on
I want to smash the shards of politeness
You repeat yourself, you repeat yourself
It’s Jonathan you long for
Grace hurts
It devours everything yet is threatened by extinction
No one loves what you do but yourself
The hardest way to move forward

The hardest way to move forward
No one loves what you do but yourself
It devours everything yet is threatened by extinction
Grace hurts
It’s Jonathan you long for
You repeat yourself, you repeat yourself
I want to smash the shards of politeness
I’ve lost my last leg to stand on

I want to smash the shards of politeness
You repeat yourself, you repeat yourself
No one loves what you do but yourself
Grace hurts
It’s Jonathan you long for
The hardest way to move forward
I’ve lost my last leg to stand on
It devours everything yet is threatened by extinction

It devours everything yet is threatened by extinction
You repeat yourself, you repeat yourself
I want to smash the shards of politeness
No one loves what you do but yourself
The hardest way to move forward
I’ve lost my last leg to stand on
It’s Jonathan you long for
Grace hurts

Grace hurts
It’s Jonathan you long for
I’ve lost my last leg to stand on
The hardest way to move forward
No one loves what you do but yourself
You repeat yourself, you repeat yourself
I want to smash the shards of politeness
It devours everything yet is threatened by extinction
Shark by Angela van Son

I started by simply trying today’s prompt on napowrimo.net: write entries for an imaginary dream dictionary, for the words Teacup, Hammer, Seagull, Ballet slipper, Shark, Wobbly table, Dentist, Rowboat.

If you’re looking for something light after all these loaded sentences, I cheerfully recommend Happy Birthday by barbaraturneywielandpoetess. Don’t let the simple title trick you into thinking you know what’s coming. Even when you know it was written for the upended phrase prompt, this will still surprise you 😉

Born out

I have tried
being bored to death
so many times
I can assure you
it doesn’t work

Refutably

I gave up
being fully engaged
every now and then
I suspect
it might work

The #NaPoWriMo prompt for day 13 invited us to write a poem in which the words or meaning of a familiar phrase get up-ended. I’m totally looking forward to where that led the other participants, I think it’s a fun prompt.

Since I wrote an elevenie instead of a haibun yesterday, I offer you two beautiful examples from fellow participants. I love Benita Kapes poem because she managed to keep it short and still totally fit the brief: Haibun clay birds. The second one is Cherry Tree by Nastasa’s summerblues. Her poem makes time stand still for a moment

Born out by Angela van Son

By Angela van Son

Utrecht (copy, paste, insert your own)

Today the first thing I do is to present a fellow participant: Shuku with her poem Family tree. Not only because the poem has SO much to offer (which it does) but also because of its beautifully written introduction. When you visit the blog, make sure you also check out Market District, Japan, 1945 (bomb-warning) and Call The Plumber, Paradise Is Stuck In The U-Bend (for a bit of lighter reading).

Enough brackets for now, here’s my poem for today. I’ve stuck to the prompt by not sticking to the suggested form. This is an elevenie about the place where I live:

Utrecht  (copy, paste, insert your own)

Tower
Rising majestically
Over mediaeval town
Visible from every direction
Homecoming

The prompt for day 12 was a to write a haibun, that takes in the natural landscape of the place you live. Poet Aimee Nezhukumatathil describes how this form ended her long search for a way to write about her travels. For me, the elevenie was an answer to that unasked question, when it got introduced to us during NaPoWriMo 2017 (thank you Gloria Gonsalves!) I wrote a number during my visit to Hamburg for example. I’ve just reread them, and they take me right back to some beautiful moments that I wouldn’t have captured otherwise.

More about how I stuck to the prompt by choosing a different form. As Aimee describes it, and important feature of the haibun is not simply to provide a shape in which to jot mundane musings of landscape and travel but also to a evoke a sense of aware —the quality of certain objects to evoke longing, sadness, or immediate sympathy.

I guess everyone who lives in an place with a distinctive tower, recognises the feeling I describe here. Seeing the tower means coming home. Hence copy, paste, insert your own… 

Domtoren Utrecht Pixabay

Contemporary vows

This user agreement
is a contract between me and you
it applies to our marriage only

By marrying me
you agree to comply
with all the terms and conditions
please read all of them carefully

We may amend this user agreement
at any time by renewing our vows –
separation takes 30 day’s prior notice

If one of us closes our marriage
we will cancel any scheduled or incomplete transactions
we must withdraw all love from our marriage prior to closing it

Both of us will remain liable for all obligations
related to any offspring the marriage produced

#NaPoWriMo day 11. The prompt by Kwoya Fagin Maples is to write “a poem that addresses the future, answering the questions “What does y(our) future provide? What is your future state of mind? If you are a citizen of the “union” that is your body, what is your future “state of the union” address?””. The clashing images of body, mind and state of the union address stood out for me.

My poem takes the contract of marriage rather literally. I took a user agreement, and adjusted it. In a way it’s found poetry… It also fits the deal/no deal prompt at Writer’s Digest I believe.

I had to hunt a poem down to share it with you today. I read it, but forgot who wrote it. But the poem lingered in my mind… Here’s Kathie Haigh‘s take on yesterday’s  simultaneity prompt: Tripping over time. I love its high tempo slow motion! When you read it, you’ll understand what I mean 🙂

User agreement

by Angela van Son

Would you pray to me?

I’m no god
but if you’d pray to me
I’d grant you all your wishes

provided

they benefit others as much as you
they are meaningful in the long run
their ecological footprint is small
they are backed by either science or religion
they cause no harm

I’d grant you all your wishes
Though I’m no god
tell me what you pray for

angel

by Angela van Son

Today’s prompt on napowrimo.net was to write about multiple things happening at once. I’ve always been puzzled what happens when people pray for opposite things at the same time – especially when they pray to the same god. Who wins?

Why don’t you walk with me and my friend Jenny through Paris,  whilst you ponder on that? She’s written a wonderful poem about finally getting something she’d never got before. Her poem is called Abandoned perspective, and it’s a lot better than my introduction of it. It features tired legs and Picasso.